Bilateral Profiles and National Agencies > Mexico

General information on Mexican development cooperation

The Mexican Ministry of Foreign Affairs has implemented development cooperation projects in an institutionalized way for many decades – mainly in Central America and the Caribbean.

Mexico’s role in the development cooperation agenda has gained new impetus recently, mainly in the context of global debates on the new international aid architecture and the concurrently increasing focus on “new actors” in international development cooperation. In Mexico, these developments have been accompanied by a clear alignment with international commitments such as the Millennium Development Goals, the Paris Declaration on Aid Effectiveness and the Accra Agenda for Action. More important, the Mexican government is strengthening its legal administrative framework to better manage its international development cooperation activities (both as a donor and as a recipient).

In April 2011, the Mexican Law for International Development Cooperation (LCID) was promulgated, effectively creating a complex and integral development cooperation system that provides the legal and institutional framework necessary to manage, implement, coordinate and monitor Mexico’s development cooperation activities, taking into account its dual nature as both provider and recipient of cooperation.

LCID created a structured Mexican cooperation system, consisting of five pillars:

  • The LCID itself, as the legal framework for the implementation of cooperation activities;
  • The Mexican Agency for International Development Cooperation (AMEXCID), formed by five Directorates-General, which has technical and administrative autonomy and is in charge of coordinating, managing and implementing Mexico’s development cooperation policy;
  • The Programme for International Development Cooperation (PROCID), currently being drafted, as the main planning instrument – this will contain Mexico’s thematic and geographical priorities on the subject;
  • The National Trust Fund for International Development Cooperation (FONCID), which will integrate all financial resources to be used in cooperation activities promoted by the Mexican Government; and
  • The National Registry for International Development Cooperation (SIMEXCID).

AMEXCID is still in a stage of configuration and consolidation, strengthening its legal administrative framework to manage international development cooperation activities (both as a donor and as a recipient) more efficiently.

Mexico states as its geographical priorities the countries in Latin America, and particularly those in Central America and the Caribbean. In 2012, Mexico implemented 153 projects in Latin America, of which 105 were directed towards Central America and the Caribbean. In this region, the favored sectors are agriculture, education, government and civil society, environment and health.

In this context, Mexico promotes innovative schemes of cooperation to enhance its effects with the overarching goal of contributing to sustainable development. An example was the Alliance Mexico for Haiti, a public–private partnership established by the Mexican government, through AMEXCID, with the participation of seven private foundations. This partnership channeled US$6 million dollars for reconstruction efforts after the 2010 earthquake in Haiti. It successfully funded several cooperation projects in education, infrastructure and health.

Aid for Trade (AfT) Strategy

Traditionally Mexico’s AfT activities have been focused on providing technical cooperation to third countries on the basis of its experience in multilateral, regional and bilateral trade negotiations. In fact, with 12 free trade agreements (FTAs) that encompass 44 countries, Mexico ranks high on the scale of bilateral and regional FTAs in the world, which means a wealth of experience on this matter to share with other developing countries. However, in 2012 no such technical cooperation activities took place with partner countries.

Mexico has also channeled concessionary funds to infrastructure projects in Central America, under the umbrella of the Mesoamerican Project, which contribute to tackle trade bottlenecks. This latter part of Mexico’s AfT activities is bound to have more relevance in the near future.

TCB cooperation initiatives with UN/international agencies and bilateral partners

In a more horizontal scheme, a Joint Cooperation Fund with Chile was set out to promote actions on competitiveness, public administration, culture and environment. The success of this Joint Fund encouraged the creation of another one with Uruguay.

In 2012, a total of 24 triangular projects, with Japan, Spain, Germany and multilateral organizations as partners, were implemented: 12 in Central America, 6 in the Caribbean and 6 in South America. The topics were environment, agriculture and civil protection.

Contact:

Mexican Agency for International Development Cooperation (AMEXCID)

Secretaría de Economía

Alfonso Reyes 30, Hipódromo Condesa, Cuauhtémoc

06140 Mexico City, Federal District, Mexico

Website: www.economia.gob.mx

www.amexcid.gob.mx

The Directorate General for Technical and Scientific Cooperation (DGCTC)

Ministry of Foreign Affairs

Juárez 20, Centro, Cuauhtémoc, 06010 Mexico City, Federal District, Mexico

Phone: +52 55 3686 5100

www.sre.gob.mx/

Mexican Agency for International Development Cooperation (AMEXCID): AMEXCID, established by five Directorates-General in 2011, has technical and administrative autonomy and is in charge of coordinating, managing and implementing Mexico’s development cooperation policy. The Agency is still in its formative stage.

The Directorate-General for the Mesoamerican Project, which is part of AMEXCID, deals with much of the trade-related infrastructure projects in third countries.

Ministry of Economy

The Ministry of Economy, in charge of trade policy, supplies Mexico’s trade-related technical cooperation. It coordinates its trade-related technical policies and programmes with the Directorate-General for Technical and Scientific Cooperation (DGCTC) at the Foreign Ministry. This coordination on trade-related technical cooperation with DGCTC is currently being enhanced by the LCID and the creation of AMEXCID.

Selected TCB programmes and initiatives in this guide

TRADE POLICY DEVELOPMENT

  • Supporting multilateral, regional and bilateral trade negotiations

PHYSICAL TRADE INFRASTRUCTURE

  • The Mesoamerican Integration and Development Project (MIDP)

SOUTH-SOUTH AND TRIANGULAR COOPERATION